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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Morphea


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Treatment

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How might morphea be treated?

There is no cure for morphea. Treatment is aimed at controlling the signs and symptoms and slowing the spread of the disease. The precise treatment depends on the extent and severity of the condition.

Some people with mild morphea may choose to defer treatment. For people with morphea involving only the skin who want treatment, treatment may involve UVA1 phototherapy (or else broad band UVA, narrow band UVB, or PUVA), tacrolimus ointment, or steroid shots. Other treatment options include high potency steroid creams, vitamin D analog creams, or imiquimod. If a persons morphea is rapidly progressive, severe, or causing significant disability treatment options may include systemic steroids (glucocorticoids) and methotrexate. People with morphea should be monitored for joint changes and referred for physical and occupational therapy as appropriate.[1]

Last updated: 11/11/2015

References
  1. Jacobe H. Treatment of morphea (localized scleroderma) in adults. In: Callen J ed. UpToDate. Waltham, MA: UpToDate; Last updated May 29, 2015; Accessed 11/11/2015.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Morphea. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
  • The Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium is an international organization of scleroderma clinical researchers. The consortium Web site contains a listing of active scleroderma trials, past copies of the Scleroderma Care and Research journal, and a tool for finding your nearest member institution. 
Related Diseases
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.