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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Gangliocytoma


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Overview

Gangliocytoma is a rare type of central nervous system (CNS) tumor made up of mature neurons. Gangliocytomas may occur in all age groups but most often occur in people between the ages of 10 and 30. The most common site is the temporal lobe of the brain, but they can arise anywhere in the CNS including the cerebellum, brainstem, floor of the third ventricle, and spinal cord. They are among the most frequent tumors associated with epilepsy. Signs and symptoms may depend on the tumor's location and may include seizures (most commonly); increased brain pressure; endocrine disorders; and focal symptoms. Gangliocytomas are generally slow-growing and usually do not become malignant. Treatment involves surgical removal of the tumor.[1][2]

Click here to view a separate page about dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum (also called Lhermitte-Duclose disease).
Last updated: 5/11/2015

References

  1. Adesina A, Rauch R. Ganglioglioma and Gangliocytoma. Atlas of Pediatric Brain Tumors. Springer International Publishing; 2010;
  2. Türeyen K, Senol N, Sav A. Gangliocytoma associated with focal cortical dysplasia in a young-adult: a case report. Turk Neurosurg. July, 2008; 18(3):259-263.
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In Depth Information

  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Gangliocytoma. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.