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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Diffuse dermal angiomatosis


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Treatment

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How might diffuse dermal angiomatosis of the breast be treated?

As this condition is quite rare, there are no established guidelines for the treatment of diffuse dermal angiomatosis of the breast.  Several treatments have been tried and seemed to be effective.  The goal of these treatments was to restore normal blood flow to the affected skin.  One woman was found to have a blocked blood vessel near the location of the diffuse dermal angiomatosis.  Surgery was performed to open this blood vessel, and the diffuse dermal angiomatosis healed following this surgery.[1]  Two patients with this condition improved after treatment with the medication isotretinoin; another patient improved after taking corticosteroid medication.[1][2]  One patient underwent a breast reduction surgery, and her diffuse dermal angiomatosis did not return following surgery.[3]
Last updated: 11/30/2011

References
  1. Yang H, Ahmed I, Mathew V, Schroeter AL. Diffuse dermal angiomatosis of the breast. Archives of Dermatology. 2006; 142:343-347. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16549710. Accessed 11/29/2011.
  2. McLaughlin ER, Morris R, Weiss SW, Arbiser JL. Diffuse dermal angiomatosis of the breast: response to isotretinoin. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2001; 45:462-465. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11511849. Accessed 11/29/2011.
  3. Villa MT, White LE, Petronic-Rosic V, Song DH. The treatment of diffuse dermal angiomatosis of the breast with reduction mammaplasty. Archives of Dermatology. 2008; 144:693-694. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18490610. Accessed 11/29/2011.


See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.