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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Aquagenic urticaria


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Overview

Aquagenic urticaria is a rare condition in which itchy urticaria (hives) develop rapidly after the skin comes in contact with water, regardless of its temperature. It most commonly affects women and symptoms often start around the onset of puberty. The exact underlying cause of aquagenic urticaria is currently unknown. Due to the rarity of the condition, there is very limited data regarding the effectiveness of individual treatments; however, various medications and therapies have been used with variable success.[1][2]
Last updated: 4/28/2015

References

  1. John P Dice, MD; Erika Gonzalez-Reyes, MD. Physical urticarias. UpToDate. October 2014; Accessed 4/27/2015.
  2. Park H, Kim HS, Yoo DS, Kim JW, Kim CW, Kim SS, Hwang JI, Lee JY, Choi YJ. Aquagenic urticaria: a report of two cases. Ann Dermatol. December 2011; 23(Suppl 3):S371-4.
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Basic Information

  • DermNet NZ is an online resource about skin diseases developed by the New Zealand Dermatological Society Incorporated. DermNet NZ provides information about this condition.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Aquagenic urticaria. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.