Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis


Other Names for this Disease
  • Juvenile enthesitis-related arthritis
  • Enthesitis related arthritis, juvenile
  • Enthesitis-related arthritis
  • ERA
  • Juvenile spondylarthropathy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis that is characterized by both arthritis and inflammation of an enthesitis site (the point at which a ligament, tendon, or joint capsule attaches to the bone). Signs and symptoms generally develop in late childhood or early adolescence and include pain, tenderness, and swelling in joints and at the enthesis. The knee and the back of the ankle (at the Achilles tendon) are the most commonly affected parts of the body. The underlying cause of enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis is currently unknown (idiopathic). It is very rare for more than one member of a family to have juvenile arthritis; however, research suggests that having a family member with juvenile arthritis or any autoimmune disease may increase the risk of having juvenile arthritis, in general. Treatment usually involves different types of medications to help manage symptoms and/or physical therapy.[1][2]
Last updated: 11/23/2015

References

  1. David D Sherry, MD. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Medscape Reference. September 2015; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1007276-overview.
  2. Juvenile Arthritis. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. June 2015; http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Juv_Arthritis/default.asp#2.
GARD Video Tutorials
GARD Video Tutorials
Learn how to find information on treatment, research, specialists, and more.
Contact GARD
Contact GARD
Contact a GARD Information Specialist with your questions about this condition.

Basic Information

  • The Cincinnati Children's Hospital has an information page on Enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Click on the link to view this information page.
  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) support research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases, the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research, and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Juvenile enthesitis-related arthritis
  • Enthesitis related arthritis, juvenile
  • Enthesitis-related arthritis
  • ERA
  • Juvenile spondylarthropathy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.