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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Onychocytic matricoma


Other Names for this Disease
  • Acanthoma of the nail matrix
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Overview

Onychocytic matricoma is a rare tumor of the nail that is generally benign. Affected people often experience thickening of the involved portion of the nail. The tumor may be pigmented (melanonychia - a black or brown pigmentation of the normal nail plate) or non-pigmented. The exact underlying cause of onychocytic matricoma is currently unknown. It generally occurs sporadically in people with no family history of the condition. Treatment generally consists of surgical excision.[1][2]
Last updated: 11/19/2015

References

  1. Wanat KA, Reid E, Rubin AI. Onychocytic matricoma: a new, important nail-unit tumor mistaken for a foreign body. JAMA Dermatol. March 2014; 150(3):335-337.
  2. Spaccarelli N, Wanat KA, Miller CJ, Rubin AI. Hypopigmented onychocytic matricoma as a clinical mimic of onychomatricoma: clinical, intraoperative and histopathologic correlations. J Cutan Pathol. June 2013; 40(6):591-594.
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In Depth Information

  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Onychocytic matricoma. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Acanthoma of the nail matrix
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.