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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Autoimmune encephalitis


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Overview

Autoimmune encephalitis refers to a group of conditions that occur when the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the cells of the brain. Affected people can experience a wide variety of neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms (please visit the Autoimmune Encephalitis Alliance's Web site for a complete list of possible signs and symptoms). The underlying cause of autoimmune encephalitis varies. In some cases, the autoimmune response is thought to be triggered by a viral or bacterial exposure, while others may be linked to the presence of cancer in the body. Autoimmune encephalitis generally occurs sporadically in people with no family history of the condition. Treatment is based on the cause of the condition and the associated signs and symptoms. Early and aggressive therapy is associated with a better prognosis (long-term outlook).[1][2]
Last updated: 9/19/2015

References

  1. Autoimmune Encephalitis FAQ. Autoimmune encephalitis Alliance. https://aealliance.org/faq/#expected-outcomes. Accessed 9/18/2015.
  2. Josep Dalmau, MD, PhD; Myrna R Rosenfeld, MD, PhD. Paraneoplastic and autoimmune encephalitis. UpToDate. August 2015; Accessed 9/20/2015.
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Basic Information

In Depth Information

  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Autoimmune encephalitis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.