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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Immunotactoid glomerulopathy


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Overview

Immunotactoid glomerulopathy, also known as glomerulonephritis with organized monoclonal microtubular immunoglobulin deposits (GOMMID),  is a very uncommon cause of glomerular disease. It is related to a similar disease known as fibrillary glomerulopathy, which is more common. Both disorders probably result from deposits derived from immunoglobulins, but in most cases the cause is idiopathic (unknown). On electron microscopy, immunotactoid glomerulopathy is characterized by the formation of microtubules which are much larger than the fibrils observed in fibrillary glomerulonephritis (30 to 50 versus 16 to 24 nm in diameter). The signs and symptoms include blood (hematuria) and protein (proteinuria) in the urine, kidney insufficiency and high blood pressure. Both fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy have been associated with hepatitis C virus infection and with malignancy and autoimmune disease. Also, patients with immunotactoid glomerulopathy have a greater risk to have chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B cell lymphomas and should be screened for all of these conditions. Treatment is generally determined by the severity of the kidney problems.[1]
Last updated: 8/18/2015

References

  1. Fervenza F, Sethi S, Appel G. Glomerular diseases due to nonamyloid fibrillar deposits. UpToDate. July 16, 2014; http://www.uptodate.com/contents/glomerular-diseases-due-to-nonamyloid-fibrillar-deposits. Accessed 8/19/2015.
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