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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Congenital short femur


Other Names for this Disease
  • Femoral agenesis/hypoplasia
  • Femoral intercalary meromelia
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Overview

Congenital short femur is a rare type of skeletal dysplasia, a complex group of bone and cartilage disorders that affect the skeleton of a fetus as it develops during pregnancy. Congenital short femur can vary in severity, ranging from hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the femur to absence of the femur. With modern surgery techniques and expertise, lengthening the shortened femur may be an option for some patients. However surgical lengthening of the femur remains a challenging procedure with risks for complications.



Last updated: 6/2/2015

References

  1. Aston WJ, Calder PR, Baker D et al. Lengthening of the congenital short femur using the Ilizarov technique: a single-surgeon series. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2009 Jul; 91(7):962-7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19567864. Accessed 6/2/2015.
  2. Widmann RF and BT Bjerke-Kroll. Limb Lengthening for the Congenital Short Femur. Grand Rounds from HSS. Winter 2013; 4(1):2,5. http://www.hss.edu/files/GRMCC_Winter2013_0304_v9.pdf. Accessed 6/2/2015.
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In Depth Information

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Other Names for this Disease
  • Femoral agenesis/hypoplasia
  • Femoral intercalary meromelia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.