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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Cutis verticis gyrata


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Overview

Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) refers to deep folds on the scalp that look similar to the folds of the brain.[1][2] In CVG there may be 2 to more than 10 folds. It most commonly develops after puberty, but before age 30. CVG may occur alone or in association with neuropsychiatric conditions, eye abnormalities, or inflammatory conditions.[1][2][3] CVG may worsen overtime. Rare cases of CVG occurring with skin cancer (melanoma) have been described.[2]
Last updated: 5/15/2014

References

  1. Skibinska MD, Janniger CK. Cutis Verticis Gyrata. eMedicine. 2008; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1113735-overview. Accessed 7/31/2009.
  2. Larson F. Cutis verticis gyrata. DermNet NZ. 2009; http://dermnetnz.org/dermal-infiltrative/cutis-verticis-gyrata.html. Accessed 7/31/2009.
  3. Chang GY. Cutis verticis gyrata, underrecognized neurocutaneous syndrome. Neurology. August 1996; 47(2):573-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8757042. Accessed 5/15/2014.
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Basic Information

  • DermNet NZ is an online resource about skin diseases developed by the New Zealand Dermatological Society Incorporated. DermNet NZ provides information about this condition.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Cutis verticis gyrata. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.