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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa


Other Names for this Disease
  • Dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, generalized
  • DDEB, generalized
  • DDEB-gen
  • Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, autosomal dominant
  • Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, autosomal dominant
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News & Events


NCATS Co-Sponsored Conferences

  • 2013 Epithelial Differentiation and Keratinization GRC/GRS, Saturday, May 11, 2013 - Sunday, May 12, 2013
    Location: Renaissance Tuscany Il Ciocco Resort, Lucca (Barga), Italy
    Description: Novel findings in rare disease gene identification, together with studies on disease mechanisms in human patients and in mouse models, will suggest novel therapeutic approaches and form the basis for new prenatal tests. Investigators including Drs. Tolar and Oro will report on the results of bone marrow stem cell therapies and small molecule therapeutics in human patients with rare skin diseases; successful outcomes of these clinical trials will spur expansion of the use of these approaches in patients. Gene correction in patient derived iPS is an exciting potential therapeutic approach to both recessive and dominant genetic skin diseases. Drs. Roop and Christiano will provide updates on derivation and characterization of iPS from patients, and will discuss approaches to gene correction and differentiation of iPS into skin cell lineages for potential use in grafting procedures

Other Names for this Disease
  • Dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, generalized
  • DDEB, generalized
  • DDEB-gen
  • Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, autosomal dominant
  • Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, autosomal dominant
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.