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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Schwartz Jampel syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Schwartz Jampel Aberfeld syndrome
  • Myotonic myopathy dwarfism chondrodystrophy and ocular and facial abnormalities
  • SJA syndrome
  • Chondrodystrophic myotonia
  • Myotonic chondrodystrophy
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Tests & Diagnosis

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How is Schwartz Jampel syndrome diagnosed?

The diagnosis of Schwartz Jampel syndrome (SJS) is suspected based on clinical findings including characteristic facial features, skeletal features, and muscle stiffness (myotonia). Studies that may be useful in diagnosing  SJS include: blood tests (which may show elevated serum creatine kinase or adolase); imaging studies; muscle biopsy; and electromyography (EMG)/nerve conduction studies. Genetic testing of the HSPG2 gene may additionally be helpful to confirm the diagnosis.[1][2]
Last updated: 4/13/2016

References
  1. Jennifer Ault. Schwartz-Jampel Syndrome. Medscape. October 09, 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1172013-overview.
  2. Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra, Thomas Gregor Issac, N. Gayathri, Sumanth Shivaram. Schwartz–Jampel syndrome. J Pediatr Neurosci. Apr-Jun 2015; 10(2):169-171. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4489067/.


Testing

  • The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) provides information about the genetic tests for this condition. The intended audience for the GTR is health care providers and researchers. Patients and consumers with specific questions about a genetic test should contact a health care provider or a genetics professional.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Schwartz Jampel Aberfeld syndrome
  • Myotonic myopathy dwarfism chondrodystrophy and ocular and facial abnormalities
  • SJA syndrome
  • Chondrodystrophic myotonia
  • Myotonic chondrodystrophy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.