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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Hecht syndrome
  • Dutch-Kentucky syndrome
  • Distal arthrogryposis type 7
  • Arthrogryposis distal type 7
Related Diseases
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

My child has trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome. We are very concerned about his trismus. We are interested in receiving any information regarding effective treatment for trismus. 

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

What is trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome?

Trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome (TPS) is a disorder of muscle development and function.[1] It is characterized by short muscles and tendons resulting in limited range of motion of the hands, legs, and mouth.[1] The most serious complications of the condition occur as a result of the limited mobility of the mouth (trismus).[2] TPS is typically reported to be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and is caused by mutations in the MYH8 gene.[1][3] Treatment may involve surgical correction and physical therapy.[1][2] 
Last updated: 7/21/2016

How might trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome be treated?

There is no one treatment for trismus-pseudocamptodactyly (TPS), however, there are various strategies that can be used to manage symptoms. Physical and/or occupational therapy may be helpful for individuals experiencing difficulties with walking and hand movement. Surgery may be performed to correct certain musculoskeletal symptoms.[4] There have been reported cases of improvement of mouth mobility following surgery and physical therapy.[1][2][5][6]
Last updated: 7/21/2016

How can I learn about research involving the treatment of trismus in people with trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome?

To learn about research opportunities, we suggest you review the information available on our get involved in research page. 
Last updated: 7/21/2016

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Hecht syndrome
  • Dutch-Kentucky syndrome
  • Distal arthrogryposis type 7
  • Arthrogryposis distal type 7
Related Diseases
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.