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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Klumpke paralysis


Other Names for this Disease
  • Lower brachial plexus palsy
  • Dejerine-Klumpke palsy
  • Klumpke's palsy
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Treatment

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How might Klumpke paralysis be treated?

The  affected arm may be immobilized across the body for 7 to 10 days.[1] For mild cases gentle massage of the arm and range-of-motion exercises may be recommended.[2] For torn nerves (avulsion and rupture injuries), symptoms may improve with surgery.[1]   

Most infants recover from neuropraxia within 4 months. Parents or guardians of infants that show no evidence of spontaneous recovery at 4 months,[3] may be counseled regarding additional treatment options. These treatment options may include:[2]

  • Surgery on the nerves (e.g., nerve grafts and neuroma excision)
  • Tendon transfers to help the muscles that are affected by nerve damage work better
Last updated: 2/25/2010

References
  1. NINDS Erb-Duchenne and Dejerine-Klumpke Palsies Information Page National. Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. 2007; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/brachial_plexus_birth/brachial_plexus_birth.htm. Accessed 2/24/2010.
  2. Brachial palsy in newborns. MedlinePlus. 2009; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001395.htm. Accessed 2/24/2010.
  3. Hill A. Neurological problems of the newborn. In: Bradley WG et al. Neurology in Clinical Practice, 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Butterworth-Heinemann; 2008;


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

Other Names for this Disease
  • Lower brachial plexus palsy
  • Dejerine-Klumpke palsy
  • Klumpke's palsy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.