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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Prolactinoma, familial


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Overview

A prolactinoma is a tumor of the pituitary gland, which controls production of many hormones.  A prolactinoma causes increased levels of the hormone prolactin.  The symptoms of prolactinoma may include unusual milk production (galactorrhea) or no menstrual cycles (amenorrhea) in women or decreased sex drive in men.[1]  Most prolactinomas occur by chance (sporadically); in a small number of cases, prolactinoma may be associated with an inherited condition such as Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) or other genetic factor.[1][2]
Last updated: 4/5/2015

References

  1. Francesca Giusti, Francesca Marini, and Maria Luisa Brandi. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1. GeneReviews. February 2015; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1538/. Accessed 4/5/2014.
  2. Trouillas J, Labat-Moleur F, Sturm N, Kujas M, Heymann MF, Figarella-Branger D, Patey M, Mazucca M, Decullier E, Vergès B, Chabre O, Calender A; Groupe d'études des Tumeurs Endocrines. Pituitary tumors and hyperplasia in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1): a case-control study in a series of 77 patients versus 2509 non-MEN1 patients. American Journal of Surgical Pathology. 2008; 32(4):534-543. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18300794. Accessed 4/5/2015.
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In Depth Information

  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
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