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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis


Other Names for this Disease
  • Sweet syndrome
  • SS
  • Neutrophilic dermatosis, acute febrile
  • Gomm Button disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

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How might acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis be treated? 

Left untreated, acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis not associated with a more serious condition may disappear on its own within one to three months. Medications can improve skin lesions and associated symptoms in just two or three days, with the worst of the lesions disappearing within one to four weeks. Doctors usually prescribe systemic corticosteroids (prednisone or prednisolone) to treat this condition. These oral anti-inflammatory medications reduce redness, itching, swelling and allergic reactions.[1] 

In the pediatric population, long-term use of corticosteroids can cause problems with linear growth, blood pressure, and blood glucose levels. Children may also have social sequelae associated with their use. Therefore, attempts are usually made to treat children with steroid-sparing drugs. Other treatment options include indomethacin, colchicine, potassium iodidedapsone, cyclosporine, etretinate, pentoxifylline, clofazimine, doxycycline, metronidazole, isotretinoin, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, and interferon alpha, all of which have shown some success in the resolution of symtpoms.[2]  

With or without treatment, the lesions rarely leave a mark or scar when they eventually disappear. Even after the lesions have resolved, treatment may continue, as recurrence of the condition is common.[1]

If an underlying cause can be identified, it should be treated (i.e. resection of solid tumors, treatment of infections, and discontinuation of causative medication). Successful therapy of the underlying disorder may promote resolution of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis and prevent recurrences.[2]

Last updated: 7/23/2009

References
  1. Sweet syndrome. MayoClinic.com. 2008; http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/sweets-syndrome/DS00752/DSECTION=all&METHOD=print. Accessed 7/23/2009.
  2. Alavian CN, Salter SA, Boer AF. Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis: Treatment & Medication. eMedicine. 2007; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1122152-treatment. Accessed 7/23/2009.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Centers for Mendelian Genomics program is working to discover the causes of rare genetic disorders. For more information about applying to the research study, please visit their website.
  • The Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool (RePORT) provides access to reports, data, and analyses of research activities at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including information on NIH expenditures and the results of NIH-supported research. There is a study titled Dermatology Consultation Clinic and Clinical Research that may be of interest to you. You may want to contact the investigator, Maria Turner (maria.turner@nih.gov) to learn more.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Sweet syndrome
  • SS
  • Neutrophilic dermatosis, acute febrile
  • Gomm Button disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.