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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Chromosome Xq duplication


Other Names for this Disease
  • Duplication Xq
  • Partial trisomy Xq
  • Trisomy Xq
  • Xq duplication
  • Xq trisomy
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Treatment

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How might chromosome Xq duplication be treated?

Because chromosome Xq duplication affects many different systems of the body, medical management is often provided by a team of doctors and other healthcare professionals. Treatment for this duplication varies based on the signs and symptoms present in each person. For example, parenteral nutrition and/or other dietary interventions may be recommended for infants and young children with feeding difficulties to prevent poor growth and malnutrition. Children with a speech and/or language delay or other problems with communication may be referred for speech and communication therapy. Medications may be prescribed to treat seizures. Children with delayed motor milestones (i.e. walking) may be referred for physical or occupational therapy. Prophylactic antibiotics may be considered in people with frequent infections.[1]

Please speak to your healthcare provider if you have any questions about your personal medical management plan.
Last updated: 3/2/2015

References
  1. Sanlaville D, Schluth-Bolard C, Turleau C.. Distal Xq duplication and functional Xq disomy. Orphanet J Rare Dis. February 2009; 4:4.


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Other Names for this Disease
  • Duplication Xq
  • Partial trisomy Xq
  • Trisomy Xq
  • Xq duplication
  • Xq trisomy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.