Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Rheumatic Fever


Other Names for this Disease
  • Acute Rheumatic Fever
  • Inflammatory Rheumatism
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory condition that may develop after infection with group A Streptococcus bacteria, such as strep throat or scarlet fever. It is primarily diagnosed in children between the ages of 6 and 16 and can affect the heart, joints, nervous system and/or skin. Early signs and symptoms include sore throat; swollen red tonsils; fever; headache; and/or muscle and joint aches. Some affected people develop rheumatic heart disease, which can lead to serious inflammation and scarring of the heart valves.[1][2][3] It is not clear why some people who are infected with group A Streptococcus bacteria go on to develop rheumatic fever, while others do not; however, it appears that some families may have a genetic susceptibility to develop the condition.[4][5] Treatment usually includes antibiotics and/or anti-inflammatory medications.[2][6]
Last updated: 1/11/2015

References

  1. Rheumatic Fever. NORD. April 2009; http://rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/469/viewAbstract.
  2. Mark R Wallace, MD, FACP, FIDSA. Rheumatic Fever. Medscape Reference. March 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/236582-overview.
  3. Rheumatic fever. MedlinePlus. May 2012; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003940.htm.
  4. Engel ME, Stander R, Vogel J, Adeyemo AA, Mayosi BM. Genetic susceptibility to acute rheumatic fever: a systematic review and meta-analysis of twin studies. PLoS One. 2011; 6(9):1-6.
  5. Bryant PA, Smyth GK, Gooding T, Oshlack A, Harrington Z, Currie B, Carapetis JR, Robins-Browne R, Curtis N. Susceptibility to acute rheumatic fever based on differential expression of genes involved in cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, and apoptosis. Infect Immun. February 2014; 82(2):753-761.
  6. Allan Gibofsky, MD, JD, FACP, FCLM; John B Zabriskie, MD. Treatment and prevention of acute rheumatic fever. UpToDate. October 2013; Accessed 1/11/2015.
GARD Video Tutorials
GARD Video Tutorials
Learn how to find information on treatment, research, specialists, and more.
Contact GARD
Contact GARD
Contact a GARD Information Specialist with your questions about this condition.

Basic Information

  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manual provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers. 
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Merck Manual for health care professionals provides information on Rheumatic Fever.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Rheumatic Fever. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Acute Rheumatic Fever
  • Inflammatory Rheumatism
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.