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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Rieger syndrome
  • Iridogoniodysgenesis with somatic anomalies
  • Goniodysgenesis hypodontia
  • Axenfeld syndrome
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Inheritance

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How is Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome inherited?

Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.

We have two copies of every gene in our body. In autosomal dominant conditions, if there is a spelling mistake (a mutation) in just one copy of that gene, then that person will develop the condition. This mutation can be inherited from a parent, or it can happen by chance for the first time in that one person, which is called a de novo mutation.

Each child of an individual with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation. Children who inherit the mutation will have Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. Although, their symptoms could be more or less severe than their parent's.
Last updated: 1/4/2016


Other Names for this Disease
  • Rieger syndrome
  • Iridogoniodysgenesis with somatic anomalies
  • Goniodysgenesis hypodontia
  • Axenfeld syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.