Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Achalasia


Other Names for this Disease
  • Esophageal achalasia
  • Primary achalasia
  • Achalasia cardia
  • Idiopathic achalasia
  • Idiopathic achalasia of esophagus
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

Newline Maker

How might achalasia be treated?

The aim of treatment is to reduce the pressure at the lower esophageal sphincter. Therapy may involve:[1][2][3]

  • Injection with botulinum toxin (Botox) to help relax the sphincter muscles (used as a temporary fix) 
  • Medications, such as long-acting nitrates (i.e. isosorbide dinitrate) or calcium channel blockers (i.e. nifedipine), to relax the lower esophagus sphincter
  • Surgery (Heller myotomy) to decrease the pressure in the lower sphincter
  • Pneumatic balloon dilation of the esophagus at the location of the narrowing (done during esophagogastroduodenoscopy)
You can learn more about these treatment options by clicking on the following links:
eMedicine Esophageal Motility Disorders
Merck Manuals Motility Disorders

A doctor should help to determine the best treatment for each individual situation.[1]
Last updated: 7/20/2011

References
  1. Dugdale DC, Longstreth GF. Achalasia. MedlinePlus. January 10, 2010; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000267.htm. Accessed 7/20/2011.
  2. DiMarino MC. Motility Disorders. Merck Manuals Online Medical Library. March 2008; http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/sec02/ch012/ch012e.html?qt=Achalasia&alt=sh. Accessed 7/20/2011.
  3. Gaumnitz EA. Esophageal Motility Disorders. eMedicine. August 29, 2009; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/174783-overview. Accessed 7/20/2011.


GARD Video Tutorial

  • Finding Treatment Information - A video developed by GARD Information Specialists that explains how you can find information about treatment for a rare disease.

    Finding Treatment Information

Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Achalasia. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Esophageal achalasia
  • Primary achalasia
  • Achalasia cardia
  • Idiopathic achalasia
  • Idiopathic achalasia of esophagus
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.