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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Ameloblastoma


Other Names for this Disease
  • Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor
  • AOT
  • Adenoameloblastoma
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Your Question

What is adenoameloblastoma? What causes it and how might it be treated?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How might ameloblastoma be treated?

The preferred treatment for ameloblastoma is surgical removal of the affected tissue. In an effort to prevent recurrence, a wide margin of healthy tissue should be removed from the area surrounding the tumor. If the tumor does return, surgery can be performed again.[1]

Ameloblastoma rarely becomes malignant. If malignant spread of the tumor occurs, radiation may be recommended. Malignancy is more common in cases that reoccur after surgery.[1]

Singh et al. have developed a Treatment Algorithm for Ameloblastoma, which you may find of interest. 
Last updated: 4/19/2016

What is ameloblastoma?

Ameloblastoma is a rare, noncancerous (benign) tumor that typically develops in the jaw near the molars. It originates in the cells that form the enamel that protects your teeth. The condition most often occurs in adults in their 30s and 40s, though it can occur at any age. In many cases, the first sign is painless swelling in the jaw. While it can be very aggressive, these tumors are rarely found outside of the jaw.[2][1] Treatment is complete surgical removal of the affected tissue.[1]
Last updated: 4/19/2016

What causes ameloblastoma?

Ameloblastoma occurs when the cells that form the protective enamel on your teeth (ameloblasts) grow in excess.[2] The reason for this abnormal growth is not well understood. Some speculate that injury to the mouth or jaw, or lack of protein or minerals in the diet may lead to the growth and development of these tumors.[1] In some cases, they appear to be associated with an impacted tooth.[3] 
Last updated: 4/19/2016

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor
  • AOT
  • Adenoameloblastoma
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.