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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Antiphospholipid syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Familial antiphospholipid syndrome
  • Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome
  • Lupus anticoagulant, familial
  • APS
  • Hughes syndrome
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Your Question

Can you provide me with the latest figures for patients with antiphospholipid syndrome in the United States and in the United Kingdom, as well as the percentage of the world population affected by this condition?


Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

Can you tell me how many people are affected by antiphospholipid syndrome in the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as the percentage of the world population affected by this condition?

There are no definitive facts about the number of people with antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in the United States (US). What we know is based on estimates from different studies over time.[1] Research suggests that aPL antibodies may be found in about 1 to 5 percent of the healthy general population.[1][2][3][4] The number of affected individuals increases with age.[3]

About 50% of people with APS have primary APS, which is when their APS is not associated with another disease. Secondary APS is when the APS occurs with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or another autoimmune disorder. Studies show that between 5-30 percent of individuals with blood clots, and no history of SLE, have aPL antibodies. In people with SLE, approximately 30 percent have aPL antibodies, and around 30-50 percent of these individuals have symptoms and signs of APS. Additional studies suggest that aPL antibodies may play a role in about one-third of strokes in people under the age of 50.[1]

The international frequency of antiphospholopid syndrome is probably similar to the US frequency. APS is not considered a rare disorder in Europe.[2][3]
Last updated: 1/18/2016

Who can I contact to obtain additional statistical information about antiphospholipid syndrome?

The APS Foundation of America and the Hughes Syndrome Foundation (from the United Kingdom) can provide you with additional statistical information about antiphospholipid syndrome. Both of these groups are focused on better understanding the condition, who it affects, and how it can be managed.
Last updated: 1/18/2016

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Familial antiphospholipid syndrome
  • Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome
  • Lupus anticoagulant, familial
  • APS
  • Hughes syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.