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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Atrophoderma of Pierini and Pasini


Other Names for this Disease
  • Idiopathic atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini
  • Congenital atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini
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Treatment

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How might atrophoderma of Pierini and Pasini be treated?

No single treatment of atrophoderma of Pierini and Pasini is consistently effective. Therapies that have been tried include topical corticosteroids, antibiotics, and antimalarials. There have been reports of symptom improvement with the use of hydroxychloroquine, potassium aminobenzoate, and improvement following surgical care using a Q-switched alexandrite laser, however these findings have not been confirmed by larger studies.[1] If a person with atrophoderma of Pierini and Pasini tests positive for B burgdorferi antibody, standard Lyme disease therapy is often recommended. Click here to visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Lyme Disease Information Resource pages to learn more about Lyme disease therapy.
Last updated: 1/21/2010

References
  1. Laumann A, Vashi N. Atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini. eMedicine. 2009; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1073949-overview. Accessed 1/21/2010.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium is an international organization of scleroderma clinical researchers. The consortium Web site contains a listing of active scleroderma trials, past copies of the Scleroderma Care and Research journal, and a tool for finding your nearest member institution. 
Other Names for this Disease
  • Idiopathic atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini
  • Congenital atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.