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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria


Other Names for this Disease
  • CBPS
  • Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome
  • Perisylvian syndrome
  • Perisylvian syndrome, congenital bilateral
  • PMGX
Related Diseases
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

Newline Maker

How might bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria be treated?

There is no cure for bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (BPP). Treatment is generally based on the signs and symptoms present in each person. For example, medications may be prescribed to treat seizures and/or epilepsy. People affected by BPP may also benefit from physical therapy, occupational therapy and/or speech therapy.[1][2]

Please speak with a healthcare provider for more specific information regarding personal medical management.
Last updated: 6/7/2015

References
  1. Chang B, Walsh CA, Apse K & Bodell A. Polymicrogyria Overview. Gene Reviews. August 6, 2007; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1329/. Accessed 3/9/2015.
  2. Congenital Bilateral Perisylvian Syndrome. NORD. 2015; http://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/congenital-bilateral-perisylvian-syndrome/.


GARD Video Tutorial

  • Finding Treatment Information - A video developed by GARD Information Specialists that explains how you can find information about treatment for a rare disease.

    Finding Treatment Information

Management Guidelines

  • GeneReviews provides current, expert-authored, peer-reviewed, full-text articles describing the application of genetic testing to the diagnosis, management, and genetic counseling of patients with specific inherited conditions. Click on the link to view the article on this topic.

Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Centers for Mendelian Genomics program is working to discover the causes of rare genetic disorders. For more information about applying to the research study, please visit their website.
  • The Christopher A. Walsh Laboratory is interested in the development of the cerebral cortex. Abnormal development of the cerebral cortex in humans results in epilepsy, autism, mental retardation, dyslexia, and other learning disorders, and perhaps some psychiatric conditions as well. Several of their projects are directed at trying to understand the basic biology of the cortex by studying the mutations that disturb its development. Conditions that they are currently researching include: double cortex syndrome, periventricular heterotopia, schizencephaly, perisylvian polymicrogyria and Walker Warburg syndrome. Click on the link above to access further information about this research.

  • The U.S. National Institutes of Health, through the National Library of Medicine, developed ClinicalTrials.gov to provide patients, family members, and members of the public with current information on clinical research studies. There is a trial titled Human Epilepsy Genetics--Neuronal Migration Disorders Study which may be of interest to you. To find this trial, click on the link above.
  • The Cortical Foundation provides information on participating in research for cortical malformations of the brain.
Other Names for this Disease
  • CBPS
  • Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome
  • Perisylvian syndrome
  • Perisylvian syndrome, congenital bilateral
  • PMGX
Related Diseases
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.