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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Chronic granulomatous disease


Other Names for this Disease
  • CGD
  • Chronic septic granulomatosis
  • Granulomatous disease, chronic
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

The information I have read said that most infections occur in younger people. I have not had any major problems until now at 56 years of age. Should I be under a doctors care regularly? Am I a candidate for disability?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

Is it uncommon for symptoms of chronic granulomatous disease to begin in adulthood?

Signs and symptoms of chronic granulomatous disease usually present in childhood, often before the age of five. However, a growing number of people with this condition are being diagnosed in later childhood or adulthood. This may be due in part to better detection of milder cases.[1]
Last updated: 2/11/2015

How might chronic granulomatous disease be treated?

Chronic granulomatous disease is typically managed with antibiotic therapy and antifungal medications to treat and prevent infection. Corticosteriods may be used to shrink granulomas (areas of inflamed tissue). A medication called Actimmune (also known as interferon gamma-1b) may also be prescribed. It is a manmade version of a substance normally produced by the body's immune cells to help fight infections. It has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of chronic granulomatous disease and may help reduce the frequency of severe infections.[2][3][4]

For some affected people, a bone marrow transplant can be used to treat and possibly cure chronic granulomatous disease.[2][3][4]

Because early diagnosis of infection is essential, people affected by chronic granulomatous disease are generally followed closely by a healthcare provider. The frequency of follow-up will depend on the severity of the condition.[2][3][4]
Last updated: 2/11/2015

Are people with chronic granulomatous disease eligible for disability?

Eligibility for disability depends not on diagnosis, but degree of condition involvement and impairment. For further information regarding your eligibility, you may find it helpful to speak with a social worker at your local hospital. In addition, you may benefit from visiting Disability.gov, which provides quick and easy access to comprehensive information about disability programs, services, laws and benefits.
Last updated: 2/11/2015

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • CGD
  • Chronic septic granulomatosis
  • Granulomatous disease, chronic
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.