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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Cold agglutinin disease


Other Names for this Disease
  • Anemia, hemolytic, cold antibody
  • CAD
  • CAS
  • Chronic cold agglutinin disease
  • Cold agglutinin syndrome
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Tests & Diagnosis

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How is cold agglutinin disease diagnosed?

A diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease may be made after several types of tests are performed by a health care provider. In some cases, the diagnosis is first suspected by chance if a routine complete blood count (CBC) detects abnormal clumping (agglutination) of the red blood cells. In most cases, the diagnosis is based on evidence of hemolytic anemia (from symptoms and/or blood tests). A person may also be physically examined for spleen or liver enlargement. An antiglobulin test (called the Coombs test) may be performed to determine the presence of a specific type of antibody. In people with cold agglutinin disease, the Coomb's test is almost always positive for immunoglobulin M (IgM).[1][2]

Detailed information about the various tests used to make a diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease is available on Medscape Reference's Web site. Please click on the link to access this resource.
Last updated: 5/6/2015

References
  1. Anemia, Hemolytic, Cold Antibody. NORD. March 27, 2008; http://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/723/viewAbstract.
  2. Salman Abdullah Aljubran, MD. Cold Agglutinin Disease. Medscape Reference. April 2015; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/135327-overview.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Anemia, hemolytic, cold antibody
  • CAD
  • CAS
  • Chronic cold agglutinin disease
  • Cold agglutinin syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.