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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Cold urticaria


Other Names for this Disease
  • Cold contact urticaria
  • Primary idiopathic cold urticaria
  • Urticaria idiopathic cold
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Treatment

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How might cold urticaria be treated?

The treatment of cold urticaria generally consists of patient education, avoiding scenarios that may trigger a reaction (i.e. cold temperatures, cold water), and/or medications. Prophylactic treatment with high-dose antihistimines may be recommended when exposure to cold is expected and can not be avoided. Additionally, affected people are often told to carry an epinephrine autoinjector due to the increased risk of anaphylaxis.[1][2]

Several other therapies have reportedly been used to treat cold urticaria with varying degrees of success. These include:[1][2]
Last updated: 9/14/2015

References
  1. Ngan V. Cold urticaria. DermNet NZ. December 29, 2013; http://dermnetnz.org/reactions/cold-urticaria.html. Accessed 7/8/2014.
  2. Marcus Maurer, MD. Cold urticaria. UpToDate. October 2014; Accessed 9/14/2015.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Cold urticaria. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Cold contact urticaria
  • Primary idiopathic cold urticaria
  • Urticaria idiopathic cold
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.