Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Cramp-fasciculation syndrome


See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

Due to the rareness of cramp-fasciculation syndrome and because it is not fatal, there is very little information and research to be found online regarding this disease.  I am interested in any information, research studies, and treatments for this condition. There are only a few of us, but we all struggle with the lack of information and research regarding this disease.

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

What is cramp-fasciculation syndrome?

Cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS) is a rare condition of the muscles. Affected people have persistent muscle twitching (fasciculations) and cramping, which can lead to muscle discomfort, pain, or tiredness. Muscles in the leg are most commonly affected, although this condition may involve several parts of the body. Symptoms are thought to be due to overactivity of the associated nerves. In most cases, CFS occurs sporadically in people with no family history of the condition. There is limited information about the treatment of CFS, but certain medications have been reported as beneficial in individual cases.[1][2][3]
Last updated: 7/14/2015

References
  • Tahmoush AJ, Alonso RJ, Tahmoush GP, Heiman-Patterson TD. Cramp-fasciculation syndrome: a treatable hyperexcitable peripheral nerve disorder. Neurology. July 1991; 41(7):1021-1024.
  • Shimatani Y, Nodera H, Shibuta Y, Miyazaki Y, Misawa S, Kuwabara S, Kaji R. Abnormal gating of axonal slow potassium current in cramp-fasciculation syndrome. Clin Neurophysiol. June 2015; 126(6):1246-1254.
  • Liewluck T, Klein CJ, Jones LK Jr.. Cramp-fasciculation syndrome in patients with and without neural autoantibodies. Muscle Nerve. March 2014; 49(3):351-356.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.