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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Crouzon syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Craniofacial dysostosis type 1
  • CFD1
  • Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis
  • Crouzon disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

I'm looking into having kids with my spouse. I have Crouzon syndrome and I was wondering if my child is guaranteed to have it. My mom has it but neither of her parents did. I'm very concerned.

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How is Crouzon syndrome inherited?

Crouzon syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This means that having a change (mutation) in only one copy of the responsible gene in each cell is enough to cause features of the condition.

There is nothing that either parent can do, before or during a pregnancy, to cause a child to be born with Crouzon syndrome.

In some cases, an affected person inherits the mutated gene from an affected parent. In other cases, the mutation occurs for the first time in a person with no family history of the condition. This is called a de novo mutation.

When a person with a mutation that causes an autosomal dominant condition has children, each child has a 50% (1 in 2) chance to inherit that mutation.
Last updated: 6/8/2016

Is there a way to prevent having a child with Crouzon syndrome?

With advanced planning and appropriate testing, it may be possible to prevent having a child with Crouzon syndrome.

During a pregnancy:
If the genetic change (mutation) in an affected family member has been identified, prenatal genetic testing may be possible during pregnancy. Genetic testing may be performed on a sample obtained by chorionic villus sampling (at about 10 to 12 weeks gestation), or by amniocentesis (usually performed at about 15 to 18 weeks gestation). If the condition is confirmed in the fetus by either method, planning for an affected child and/or pregnancy management options, may be discussed with a health care provider.

Before a pregnancy:
As an alternative to prenatal diagnosis during the pregnancy, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) before a pregnancy may be an option if the mutations in the family are known. PGD is done after in vitro fertilization (IVF) to diagnose a genetic condition in an embryo before it is introduced into the uterus. When having PGD, only embryos known to be unaffected are introduced into the uterus for a possible pregnancy.

People interested in genetic testing, prenatal diagnosis, and/or PGD should speak with a genetic counselor or other genetics professional regarding their testing options. A genetics professional can help by:
  • thoroughly evaluating the family history
  • addressing questions and concerns
  • assessing recurrence risks
  • facilitating genetic testing if desired
  • discussing reproductive options
Last updated: 6/8/2016

How can I find a genetics professional in my area?

To find a medical professional who specializes in genetics, you can ask your doctor for a referral or you can search for one yourself. Online directories are provided by GeneTests, the American College of Medical Genetics, and the National Society of Genetic Counselors. If you need additional help, contact a GARD Information Specialist. You can also learn more about genetic consultations from Genetics Home Reference.
Last updated: 7/15/2016

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Craniofacial dysostosis type 1
  • CFD1
  • Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis
  • Crouzon disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.