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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Eosinophilic fasciitis


Other Names for this Disease
  • Shulman syndrome
  • EF
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Treatment

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How might eosinophilic fasciitis be treated?

About 10-20% of people with eosinophilic fasciitis recover spontaneously without treatment.  For those who do not, glucocorticoids (0.5–1 mg/kg/d), such as prednisone, are the mainstay therapy. Even with treatment, improvement in symptoms can take weeks or months. Glucocorticoids are successful in treating eosionophilic fasciitis in over 70% of cases.[1] If glucocorticoids are unsuccessful, methotrexate at low doses (15–25 mg once weekly) is probably the most favored second-line treatment, especially in people with reddish to purpleish (morphea-like) skin lesions.[2]  Other treatment options include NSAIDs, D-penicillamine, chloroquine, cimetidine, azathioprine, cyclosporin A, infliximab, UVA-1, and bath PUVA.[1] Physical therapy may help improve joint mobility and decrease contractures. Surgical release has been used in some severe cases to manage significant joint contractures.[3]
Last updated: 11/12/2015

References
  1. Danis R et al.,. Unusual presentation of eosinophilic fasciitis: two case reports and a review of the literature. J Med Case Reports. 2010; 4:46. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2830980. Accessed 6/11/2015.
  2. Pinal-Fernandez I, Selva-O' Callaghan A, Grau JM. Diagnosis and classification of eosinophilic fasciitis. Autoimmun Rev. 2014 Apr-May; 13(4-5):379-82. Accessed 6/11/2015.
  3. Henning PM. Eosinophilic Fasciitis. Medscape Reference. March 2015; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/329515-overview. Accessed 11/12/2015.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Eosinophilic fasciitis. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Shulman syndrome
  • EF
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.