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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Factor X deficiency


Other Names for this Disease
  • Factor X deficiency, congenital
  • Stuart factor deficiency, congenital
  • Stuart-Prower factor deficiency
  • F10 deficiency
  • Congenital factor X deficiency
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Factor X deficiency is a rare condition that affects the blood's ability to clot. The severity of the condition and the associated signs and symptoms can vary significantly from person to person. Common features of factor X deficiency may include easy bruising, frequent nosebleeds, bleeding gums, blood in the urine, and prolonged bleeding after minor injuries. Affected women may also experience heavy menstrual bleeding and may have an increased risk for first trimester miscarriages.[1][2] Acquired (non-inherited) factor X deficiency, which is the most common form of the condition, generally occurs sporadically in people with no family history of the condition. Acquired factor X deficiency has a variety of causes including liver disease, vitamin K deficiency, exposure to certain medications that affect clotting, and cancers. The inherited form of factor X deficiency (also called congenital factor X deficiency) is caused by changes (mutations) in the F10 gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.[3] Treatment aims to control bleeding through intravenous (IV) infusions of plasma or concentrates of clotting factors.[2][1]
Last updated: 11/12/2015

References

  1. Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH. Factor X Deficiency. Medscape Reference. November 2015; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/209867-overview.
  2. Factor X deficiency. MedlinePlus. January 2015; https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000553.htm.
  3. Factor X deficiency. Genetics Home Reference. January 2015; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/factor-x-deficiency.
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Basic Information

  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Factor X deficiency. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Factor X deficiency. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Factor X deficiency, congenital
  • Stuart factor deficiency, congenital
  • Stuart-Prower factor deficiency
  • F10 deficiency
  • Congenital factor X deficiency
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.