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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Fibrous dysplasia


Other Names for this Disease
  • Fibrous dysplasia of bone
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Fibrous dysplasia is a skeletal disorder that is characterized by the replacement of normal bone with fibrous bone tissue. It may involve one bone (monostotic) or multiple bones (polyostotic).[1][2] Fibrous dysplasia can affect any bone in the body. The most common sites are the bones in the skull and face, the long bones in the arms and legs, the pelvis, and the ribs.[1] Though many individuals with this condition do not have any symptoms, others may have bone pain, abnormally shaped bones, or an increased risk of fractures (broken bones).[1][2] This condition can occur alone or as part of a genetic disorder, such as McCune-Albright syndrome.[1] While there is no cure for fibrous dysplasia, the symptoms can be treated. Medications known as bisphosphonates can reduce pain and surgery may be indicated for fractures or to correct misshapen bones.[1][2] 
Last updated: 4/4/2016

References

  1. Fibrous Dysplasia Overview. NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center. June 2015; http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Additional_Bone_Topics/fibrous_dysplasia.asp.
  2. Kaneshiro NK, Zieve D. Fibrous dysplasia. MedlinePlus. December 4, 2013; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001234.htm.
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Basic Information

  • The Children's Hospital Boston's Web site has an information page on this topic. Click on the link above to view this information page.
  • The MayoClinic.com Web site has an information page on fibrous dysplasia. Click on MayoClinic.com to view the information page.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) has a report for patients and families about this condition. NORD is a patient advocacy organization for individuals with rare diseases and the organizations that serve them.
  • The Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center provides patients, health professionals, and the public with an important link to resources and information on metabolic bone diseases, including osteoporosis, Paget's disease of the bone, osteogenesis imperfecta, and hyperparathyroidism. Contact them directly by calling toll-free at 800-624-2663 or by e-mail at NIAMSBoneInfo@mail.nih.gov

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • MeSH® (Medical Subject Headings) is a terminology tool used by the National Library of Medicine. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Fibrous dysplasia. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Fibrous dysplasia of bone
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.