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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Gardner syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Gardner's syndrome
  • Intestinal polyposis, osteomas, sebaceous cysts
  • Polyposis coli and multiple hard and soft tissue tumors
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Treatment

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How might Gardner syndrome be treated?

Although there is no cure for Gardner syndrome, treatment and management options are available to reduce the risk of cancer. For example, affected people typically undergo regular screening for the various polyps and tumors associated with Gardner syndrome to permit early diagnosis and treatment. This screening regimen may include:[1][2]
  • Sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy every one to two years, beginning at age ten to 12 years. Once polyps are detected, colonoscopy is recommended annually until colectomy (removal of colon).
  • EGD (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) beginning by age 25 and repeated every one to three years.
  • Annual physical examination, including a thorough thyroid evaluation beginning in the late teenage years.
  • Screening for desmoid tumors and hepatoblastoma (a specific type of liver cancer that is diagnosed in young children) may also be recommended in some people.

A colectomy is usually recommended when more than 20 or 30 polyps and/or multiple advanced polyps are identified. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs), is sometimes prescribed in people with Gardner syndrome who have had a colectomy to treat polyps in the remaining rectum.[2][3]

Treatment for desmoid tumors varies depending on the size and location of the tumor, but may include watchful waiting, surgery, NSAIDS, anti-estrogen medications, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy.[2][3] Osteomas (bony growths) may be removed for cosmetic reasons.[2] Treatment of epidermoid cysts in Gardner syndrome is similar to that used for ordinary cysts and involves excision.[4]

For more information on the treatment and management of Gardner syndrome, please click here.
Last updated: 1/14/2015

References
  1. Genetic Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal Panel Members. Genetic Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. February 2014; Accessed 1/14/2015.
  2. Kory W Jasperson, MS and Randall W Burt, MD. APC-Associated Polyposis Conditions. GeneReviews. March 27, 2014; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1345/. Accessed 4/6/2015.
  3. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis. NORD. January 2014; https://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/142/viewAbstract.
  4. Gardner syndrome. DermNet NZ. December 2014; http://www.dermnetnz.org/systemic/gardner.html.


GARD Video Tutorial

  • Finding Treatment Information - A video developed by GARD Information Specialists that explains how you can find information about treatment for a rare disease.

    Finding Treatment Information

Management Guidelines

  • GeneReviews provides current, expert-authored, peer-reviewed, full-text articles describing the application of genetic testing to the diagnosis, management, and genetic counseling of patients with specific inherited conditions. Click on the link to view the article on this topic.

Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Gardner syndrome. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
  • The Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool (RePORT) provides access to reports, data, and analyses of research activities at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including information on NIH expenditures and the results of NIH-supported research. Although these projects may not conduct studies on humans, you may want to contact the investigators to learn more. To search for studies, enter the disease name in the "Text Search" box. Then click "Submit Query".
Other Names for this Disease
  • Gardner's syndrome
  • Intestinal polyposis, osteomas, sebaceous cysts
  • Polyposis coli and multiple hard and soft tissue tumors
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.