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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Gliomatosis cerebri


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Overview

Gliomatosis cerebri is a type of malignant (cancerous) brain tumor called a glioblastoma that develops from a specific type of brain cell called an astrocyte.[1] It involves at least three sections (lobes) within the main part of the brain (cerebrum). It may also affect both sides of the cerebrum as well as the nerve cells within the brain (grey matter). There are two types of gliomatosis cerebri. Type 1 (classic form) is characterized by scattered and widespread tumor cells and no apparent mass or tumor, while type 2 has similar characteristics in addition to a detectable mass or tumor.[2] Signs and symptoms of gliomatosis cerebri may include personality changes, memory disturbance, headaches, and seizures.[3] Because this type of cancer can be found in many areas of the brain, it can be challenging to treat. Treatment might include surgery to remove areas of the brain affected (when possible), radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.[2]
Last updated: 7/21/2016

References

  1. Jeffrey Greenfield. Gliomatosis Cerebri. Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center. Janurary 2015; http://weillcornellbrainandspine.org/condition/gliomatosis-cerebri.
  2. Chen S, Tanaka S, Giannini C, Morris J, Yan ES, Buckner J, Lachance DH, Parney IF. Gliomatosis cerebri: clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes. J Neurooncol. April 2013; 112(2):267-75. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3907195/.
  3. Uddin S, Jarmi T. Neurologic Manifestations of Glioblastoma Multiforme. Medscape. Nov 9, 2015; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1156220-overview.
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Basic Information

  • The National Cancer Institute provides the most current information on cancer for patients, health professionals, and the general public.
  • The National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides current information on brain tumors. The NCI conducts and supports cancer research and training and provides cancer information to patients, health professionals, and the general public.
  • The Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center provides information on Gliomatosis cerebri 

In Depth Information

  • MeSH® (Medical Subject Headings) is a terminology tool used by the National Library of Medicine. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Gliomatosis cerebri. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.