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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Hashimoto's syndrome

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* Not a rare disease
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Other Names for this Disease
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis
  • Hashimoto's disease
  • Hashimoto's struma
  • Thyroiditis, chronic
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Hashimoto’s syndrome is a form of chronic inflammation that can damage the thyroid, reducing its ability to produce hormones (hypothyroidism). An early sign of the condition may be enlargement of the thyroid (called a goiter), which can potentially interfere with breathing or swallowing. Other signs and symptoms may include tiredness, weight gain, thin and dry hair, joint or muscle pain, constipation, cold intolerance, and/or a slowed heart rate. Affected women may have irregular menstrual periods or difficulty becoming pregnant. Hashimoto’s syndrome is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. It is more common in women than in men, and it usually appears in mid-adulthood. The exact cause is unknown but it is thought to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Treatment is not always needed, but may include taking synthetic thyroid hormone.[1][2][3]
Last updated: 6/30/2015

References

  1. Hashimoto's Disease. National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Information Service. May 14, 2014; http://endocrine.niddk.nih.gov/pubs/Hashimoto/index.htm. Accessed 7/6/2009.
  2. Lee SL. Hashimoto Thyroiditis. Medscape Reference. July 3, 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/120937-overview. Accessed 5/1/2015.
  3. Hashimoto thyroiditis. Genetics Home Reference. July, 2013; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/hashimoto-thyroiditis.
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Basic Information

  • Genetics Home Reference contains information on Hashimoto's syndrome. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers. 
  • The National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Information Service, a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view the information on this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • TheDoctorsDoctor.com Web site has an information page on Hashimoto syndrome. Click on the link above to view the Web page.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Hashimoto's syndrome. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis
  • Hashimoto's disease
  • Hashimoto's struma
  • Thyroiditis, chronic
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.