Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Hidradenitis suppurativa

*

* Not a rare disease

Other Names for this Disease
  • Acne inversa
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic skin disease characterized by recurrent, painful, boil-like lumps (nodules) under the skin. HS affects the areas around skin folds (e.g., armpits, groin, and breasts) and where apocrine glands (a form of sweat gland) and hair follicles are found. It is not contagious, but it is recurrent. It typically manifests as a single boil-like, pus-filled abscess or hard sebaceous lumps (lumps composed of sebum, or oil, which is excreted by the sebacous glands associated with hair follicles) and may progress to painful, deep-seated, inflamed clusters of lesions with chronic seepage involving significant scarring.[1][2] In most cases, the cause of HS is unknown. It is likely that it results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Some cases of HS have been associated with specific genes, including NCSTN, PSEN1, and PSENEN.[3] 
Last updated: 3/6/2015

References

  1. Lee R. Hidradenitis Suppurativa. National Organization of Rare Disorders Web site. 2012; http://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/358/viewAbstract. Accessed 3/6/2015.
  2. What is hidradenitis suppurativa?. Hidradenitis Suppurativa Foundation, Inc.. 2014; http://www.hs-foundation.org/about-hs/what-is-hs/. Accessed 3/6/2015.
  3. Hidradenitis suppurativa. Genetics Home Reference. December 2013; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/hidradenitis-suppurativa. Accessed 3/6/2015.
GARD Video Tutorials
GARD Video Tutorials
Learn how to find information on treatment, research, specialists, and more.
Your Questions Answered
Your Questions Answered
View questions about this condition answered by GARD Information Specialists. You can also submit a new question.

Basic Information

  • The American College of Osteopathic Dermatology (ACOD) has developed an information page on hidradenitis suppurativa.  Click on the ACOD link to learn more.
  • DermNet NZ is an online resource about skin diseases developed by the New Zealand Dermatological Society Incorporated. DermNet NZ provides information about this condition.
  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Hidradenitis suppurativa. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • eMedicine has three articles on this topic from the perspective of Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, and General Surgery. You may need to register to view the information online, but registration is free. Click on the links above to view the articles from this medical reference Web site.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Hidradenitis suppurativa. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Acne inversa
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.