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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Hypophosphatemic rickets


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Overview

Hypophosphatemic rickets (previously called vitamin D-resistant rickets) is a disorder in which the bones become painfully soft and bend easily, due to low levels of phosphate in the blood.[1] Symptoms usually begin in early childhood and can range in severity. Severe forms may cause bowing of the legs and other bone deformities; bone pain; joint pain; poor bone growth; and short stature. In some affected babies, the space between the skull bones closes too soon (craniosynostosis). This sometimes results in developmental abnormalities. Hypophosphatemic rickets is almost always inherited and may be caused by changes (mutations) in any of several genes.[1] Most commonly it is due to the PHEX gene and inherited in an X-linked dominant manner. Less commonly it is inherited in an X-linked recessive manner (often called Dent disease); autosomal dominant manner; or autosomal recessive manner.[2][3] Treatment involves taking phosphate and calcitriol in order to raise phosphate levels in the blood and promote normal bone formation.[1]
Last updated: 3/1/2016

References

  1. Christopher J. LaRosa. Hypophosphatemic Rickets. Merck Manual. 2015; http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/children-s-health-issues/congenital-kidney-tubular-disorders/hypophosphatemic-rickets.
  2. Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets. Genetics Home Reference. September, 2010; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/hereditary-hypophosphatemic-rickets.
  3. Marla J. F. O'Neill. HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC RICKETS, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE, 2. OMIM. Match 19, 2010; http://omim.org/entry/613312.
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Basic Information

  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Hypophosphatemic rickets. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers. 
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Hypophosphatemic rickets. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Related Diseases
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.