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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Hanhart syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Aglossia adactylia
  • Aglossia-adactylia syndrome
  • Hypoglossia-hypodactylia syndrome
  • Hypoglossia-hypodactyly syndrome
  • Jussieu syndrome
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Treatment

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How is Hanhart syndrome treated?

Because Hanhart syndrome affects many different systems of the body, medical management is often provided by a team of doctors and other healthcare professionals. Treatment for this condition varies because it depends on the signs and symptoms present in each person. For example, limb and/or craniofacial abnormalities may be treated with surgery and/or prostheses. Affected children may also need speech therapy, physical therapy, and/or occupational therapy.[1][2][3]
Last updated: 5/3/2015

References
  1. Hanhart Syndrome. NORD. February 2008; http://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/1022/viewAbstract.
  2. Hypoglossia-hypodactyly syndrome. Orphanet. July 2005; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=EN&Expert=989.
  3. Manisha Goyal, Ankur Singh, Pratiksha Singh, and Seema Kapoor. Hypoglossia-Hypodactyly Syndrome with Short Stature - A Case Report. J Clin Diagn Res. April 2014; 8(4):SD01–SD02.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Centers for Mendelian Genomics program is working to discover the causes of rare genetic disorders. For more information about applying to the research study, please visit their website.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Aglossia adactylia
  • Aglossia-adactylia syndrome
  • Hypoglossia-hypodactylia syndrome
  • Hypoglossia-hypodactyly syndrome
  • Jussieu syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.