Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Kartagener syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Dextrocardia bronchiectasis and sinusitis
  • PCD
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia
  • Siewert syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Cause

Newline Maker

What causes Kartagener syndrome?

Kartagener syndrome can be caused by changes (mutations) in many different genes. These genes encode proteins that are important to the structure and function of cilia. Cilia are tiny, hair-like structures that are found on the surface of cells in various parts of the body such as the lining of the airway, the reproductive system, and other organs. The coordinated movement of cilia in wave-like motions is important to the normal functioning of certain organs and tissues throughout the body and ensures the proper placement of organs in the developing embryo. Mutations in these genes cause the cilia to be either immotile (unable to move) or dysmotile (they move incorrectly), which leads to the many signs and symptoms of Kartagener syndrome.[1][2][3]

Scientists have identified several different genes that are associated with Kartagener syndrome; however, the genetic cause is unknown in some cases.[1][2][3]
Last updated: 2/1/2015

References
  1. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. NORD. June 2012; http://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/526/viewAbstract.
  2. Primary ciliary dyskinesia. Genetics Home Reference. April 2014; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/primary-ciliary-dyskinesia.
  3. John P Bent lll, MD. Kartagener Syndrome. Medscape Reference. February 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/299299-overview.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Dextrocardia bronchiectasis and sinusitis
  • PCD
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia
  • Siewert syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.