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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Kawasaki syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Kawasaki disease
  • Mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome
Related Diseases
  • Secondary glomerular disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

My child was diagnosed with Kawasaki syndrome last month, and I found out that another child in the same daycare center was diagnosed with Kawasaki syndrome one year ago.  I know this condition is rare, and I thought it was unusual for two kids from the same day care center to have Kawasaki syndrome.  Is there a method for tracking Kawasaki syndrome?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

What is Kawasaki syndrome?

Kawasaki syndrome is a condition that involves inflammation of the blood vessels. It is typically diagnosed in young children, but older children and adults can also develop this condition. Kawasaki syndrome often begins with a fever that lasts at least 5 days. Other classic symptoms may include red eyes, lips, and mouth; rash; swollen and red hands and feet; and swollen lymph nodes.[1] Sometimes the condition affects the coronary arteries (which carry oxygen-rich blood to the heart). This can lead to serious heart problems. Kawasaki syndrome occurs most often in people of Asian and Pacific Island descent.[2] The cause of Kawasaki disease is unknown.[1][2] An infection along with genetic factors may be involved.[2] Treatment includes intravenous gamma globulin and high doses of aspirin in a hospital setting.[1][2]  
Last updated: 2/3/2016

What causes Kawasaki syndrome?

The cause of Kawasaki syndrome isn't known. The body's response to a virus or infection combined with genetic factors may cause the disease. However, no specific virus or infection has been found, and the role of genetics is not well understood.[2][3] Kawasaki syndrome is not contagious; it can't be passed from one child to another.[2]
Last updated: 2/3/2016

Is there a method for tracking Kawasaki syndrome?

Cases of Kawasaki syndrome are tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) using hospital discharge data, a surveillance system, and research studies. The Kawasaki syndrome surveillance system is based on voluntary reporting by health care providers and local and state health authorities. For more information, we recommend that you contact the CDC or your local health department.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, & Enteric Diseases (NCZVED)
1600 Clifton Road, NE
MS D-76
Atlanta, GA 30329-4018
Toll-free 800-311-3435
http://www.cdc.gov/kawasaki/
Last updated: 3/17/2008

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Kawasaki disease
  • Mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome
Related Diseases
  • Secondary glomerular disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.