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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Landau-Kleffner syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Acquired aphasia with convulsive disorder
  • Acquired epileptic aphasia
  • Acquired epileptiform aphasia
  • LKS
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Overview

Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare, childhood neurological disorder characterized by the sudden or gradual development of aphasia (the inability to understand or express language) and an abnormal electro-encephalogram (EEG). The disorder usually occurs in children between age 2 and 8.[1][2] Typically, children with LKS develop normally but then lose their language skills for no apparent reason. While many of the affected individuals have seizures, some do not. The disorder is difficult to diagnose and may be misdiagnosed as autism, pervasive developmental disorder, hearing impairment, learning disability, auditory/verbal processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, intellectual disability, childhood schizophrenia, or emotional/behavioral problems. Treatment for LKS usually consists of medications, such as anticonvulsants and corticosteroids, and speech therapy, which should be started promptly. The prognosis varies. Some children may have a permanent language disorder, while others may regain much of their language abilities (although it may take months or years).[1]
Last updated: 4/13/2015

References

  1. NINDS Landau-Kleffner Syndrome Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Website. October 17, 2008; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/landaukleffnersyndrome/landaukleffnersyndrome.htm. Accessed 4/13/2015.
  2. Loddenkemper T, Sanchez Fernandez I. Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Orphanet. March 2014; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=en&Expert=98818. Accessed 4/13/2015.
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Basic Information

  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) collects and disseminates research information related to neurological disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Acquired aphasia with convulsive disorder
  • Acquired epileptic aphasia
  • Acquired epileptiform aphasia
  • LKS
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.