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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Laron syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome
  • Pituitary dwarfism II
  • Growth hormone receptor deficiency
  • Primary growth hormone resistance
  • Primary growth hormone insensitivity
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

My grandson has the condition. I want to know if there is medication that will result in a normal stature.

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How might Laron syndrome be treated?

There is currently no cure for Laron syndrome. Treatment is primarily focused on improving growth.[1] The only specific treatment available for this condition is subcutaneous injections of insulin-like growth factor 1 (a growth-promoting hormone), often called IGF-1. IGF-1 stimulates linear growth (height) and also improves brain growth and metabolic abnormalities caused by long-term IGF-1 deficiency. It has also been shown to raise blood glucose levels, reduce cholesterol, and increase muscle growth.[2] IGF-1 and GH levels should be closely monitored in people undergoing this treatment because overdosage of IGF-I causes a variety of health problems.[3]
Last updated: 9/30/2015

References
  • J. Léger. Laron syndrome. Orphanet. November 2009; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=EN&Expert=633. Accessed 11/2/2011.
  • Laron Z. Growth hormone insensitivity (Laron syndrome). Rev Endocr Metab Disord. December 2002; 3(4):347-355.
  • Laron Z. Insulin-like growth factor-I treatment of children with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone insensitivity). Pediatr Endocrinol Rev. March 2008; 5(3):766-771.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome
  • Pituitary dwarfism II
  • Growth hormone receptor deficiency
  • Primary growth hormone resistance
  • Primary growth hormone insensitivity
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.