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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Laron syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome
  • Pituitary dwarfism II
  • Growth hormone receptor deficiency
  • Primary growth hormone resistance
  • Primary growth hormone insensitivity
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

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How might Laron syndrome be treated?

There is currently no cure for Laron syndrome. Treatment is primarily focused on improving growth.[1] The only specific treatment available for this condition is subcutaneous injections of insulin-like growth factor 1 (a growth-promoting hormone), often called IGF-1. IGF-1 stimulates linear growth (height) and also improves brain growth and metabolic abnormalities caused by long-term IGF-1 deficiency. It has also been shown to raise blood glucose levels, reduce cholesterol, and increase muscle growth.[2] IGF-1 and GH levels should be closely monitored in people undergoing this treatment because overdosage of IGF-I causes a variety of health problems.[3]
Last updated: 9/30/2015

References
  1. J. Léger. Laron syndrome. Orphanet. November 2009; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=EN&Expert=633. Accessed 11/2/2011.
  2. Laron Z. Growth hormone insensitivity (Laron syndrome). Rev Endocr Metab Disord. December 2002; 3(4):347-355.
  3. Laron Z. Insulin-like growth factor-I treatment of children with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone insensitivity). Pediatr Endocrinol Rev. March 2008; 5(3):766-771.


GARD Video Tutorial

  • Finding Treatment Information - A video developed by GARD Information Specialists that explains how you can find information about treatment for a rare disease.

    Finding Treatment Information

Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Laron syndrome. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.

Medical Products

The medication(s) listed in the table(s) below have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of this condition. The FDA Office of Orphan Products Development designates "orphan products" for those that treat rare diseases affecting fewer than 200,000 Americans. The table(s) below may not be an exhaustive list of drugs or products used to treat this condition. There may be other products available that are not considered orphan products. To search for all FDA approved drugs, visit Drugs@FDA. You can find orphan products used to treat other conditions by searching the Orphan Drug Product Designation database.


Generic Name Mecasermin
Trade Name
(Manufacturer Name)
Increlex®
(Tercica, Inc.)
Indication
The FDA has approved this product to be used in this manner.
Long-term treatment of growth failure in children with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency (Primary IGFD) or with growth hormone (GH) gene deletion who have developed neutralizing antibodies to growth hormone.
More Information about this product Drug Information Portal

Generic Name Mecasermin rinfabate
Trade Name
(Manufacturer Name)
Iplex®
(Insmed, Inc.)
Indication
The FDA has approved this product to be used in this manner.
Treatment of growth failure in children with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency (Primary IGFD) or with growth hormone (GH) gene deletion who have developed neutralizing antibodies to growth hormone
More Information about this product Drug Information Portal

Other Names for this Disease
  • Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome
  • Pituitary dwarfism II
  • Growth hormone receptor deficiency
  • Primary growth hormone resistance
  • Primary growth hormone insensitivity
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.