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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Lemierre syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Oropharyngeal infection leading to secondary septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein
  • Necrobacillosis
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Treatment

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How is Lemierre syndrome treated?

Most cases of internal jugular thrombophlebitis can be managed medically without the need for surgery of the infected vein. Prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics (3 to 6 weeks) is usually required. Anticoagulants have sometimes been used, but efficacy is unconfirmed. Surgery of the internal jugular vein may be required only in the rare patient who fails to respond to antibiotic treatment alone.[1][2][3]
Last updated: 2/13/2016

References
  1. Schwartz RH. Chapter 30: Infections Related to the Upper and Middle Airways. In: Long SS, Pickering LK, Prober CG. Long: Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 3rd ed. PA: Churchill Livingstone, An Imprint of Elsevier; 2008;
  2. Srivali N, Ungprasert P, Kittanamongkolchai W, Ammannagari N. Lemierre's syndrome: An often missed life-threatening infection. Indian J Crit Care Med. 2014 Mar; 18(3):170-2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3963201/.
  3. Charles K, Flinn WR, Neschis DG. Lemierre’s syndrome: A potentially fatal complication that may require vascular surgical intervention. J Vasc Surg. 2005 Nov; 42(5):1023-1025. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0741521405010876.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Oropharyngeal infection leading to secondary septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein
  • Necrobacillosis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.