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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Light chain deposition disease


Other Names for this Disease
  • Light-chain deposition disease
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Overview

Light chain deposition disease (LCDD) involves the immune system, the body's system of protecting ourselves against infection. The body fights infection with antibodies. Antibodies are made up of small protein segments called light chains and heavy chains. People with LCDD make  too many light chains which get deposited in many different tissues and organs of the body. While LCDD can occur in any organ, the kidneys are always involved. Deposits of light chains can also occur in the liver, heart, small intestine, spleen, skin, nervous system and bone marrow. Additionally, about 50-60% of patients with LCDD have multiple myeloma and 17% have a disease called monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). Early signs and symptoms of light chain deposition disease may include protein in the urine, high blood pressure, decreased kidney function, and nephrotic syndrome. The goal of treatment in patients with LCDD is to stop/decrease the production of light chains and damage to organs. Treatment options can include: autologous stem cell transplantation; a drug called Bortezomib; a class of drugs called immunomodulatory drugs; and kidney transplant.
Last updated: 5/11/2015

References

  1. Boppana S and RA Sacher. Light-Chain Deposition Disease. Medscape Reference. 06/17/2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/202585-overview. Accessed 5/11/2015.
  2. Light Chain Deposition Disease. University of North Carolina Kidney Center. http://www.unckidneycenter.org/kidneyhealthlibrary/lightchain.html. Accessed 5/11/2015.
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Other Names for this Disease
  • Light-chain deposition disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.