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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Meningioma


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Overview

Meningiomas originate in the meninges, the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. Most meningiomas are benign, though a minority of meningiomas can be classified as atypical or malignant.[1][2] Though rare, malignant meningiomas can be highly aggressive.[2] However, even benign meningiomas can cause problems if their growth affects the neighboring areas of the brain. Though most meningiomas grow slowly, there is no way to predict the rate of growth for a particular meningioma or to know how long a specific meningioma was growing before it was diagnosed. Signs and symptoms can vary but may include seizures, headaches, weakness in the arms and legs, and vision loss. Sometimes memory loss, carelessness, and unsteadiness are the only symptoms.[1]

Last updated: 10/23/2015

References

  1. Facts about Meningiomas. Brigham and Women's Hospital. Feb 27, 2015; http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/neurosurgery/meningioma/meningiomafacts.aspx. Accessed 10/23/2015.
  2. Meningioma Brochure. American Brain Tumor Association. 2012. http://www.abta.org/secure/meningioma-brochure.pdf. Accessed 10/23/2015.
  3. Meningioma. National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). 2002; http://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/301/viewAbstract. Accessed 7/20/2011.
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Basic Information

  • The National Cancer Institute provides the most current information on cancer for patients, health professionals, and the general public.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.