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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Myxoid liposarcoma


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Overview

Myxoid liposarcoma is a subtype of liposarcoma, tumors that arise in the body’s fat tissue. Other categories of liposarcoma include well-differentiated; dedifferentiated; round cell; and pleomorphic. [1] Round cell and myxoid liposarcomas are sometimes grouped together into one category known as myxoid/round cell liposarcoma (MRCLS).[2] In adults, liposarcomas are the most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. The cause of liposarcomas is not well-established but trauma has been implicated in some cases. Myxoid liposarcomas generally arise in the lower extremities. Symptoms may vary depending on the location of the tumor but may include swelling; decreased range of motion; numbness; fatigue; abdominal pain; weight loss; nausea; and vomiting. Many patients with liposarcoma have no symptoms until the tumor is large and interferes with neighboring structures. When possible, surgical removal is the preferred treatment. In some cases, additional therapy may be indicated. [1] The prognosis is generally favorable for those with a low grade myxoid liposarcoma with a small percentage of round cells. A significant round cell component is associated with a poorer prognosis. [1][2]  Although these tumors rarely spread, they can recur if not completely removed.[1] 
Last updated: 6/24/2016

References

  1. Schwartz, Robert A.. Liposarcoma. Medscape. Feb. 4, 2016; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1102007-overview. Accessed 6/24/2016.
  2. Singer, Samuel. Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma. Orphanet. Jan, 2013; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Expert=99967. Accessed 6/24/2016.
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  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European database for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.
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See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.