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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Pemphigus


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Treatment

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How is pemphigus treated?

High-dose oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone or prednisolone, are the main treatment for pemphigus. These are anti-inflammatory medicines that suppress the immune system.[1] High doses are often required to bring pemphigus under control. To keep the levels of corticosteroid use to a minimum, immunosuppressive drugs are often added to a patient’s treatment. These drugs stop or slow down the immune system’s response to what it sees as an attack on the body. They include:[1][2]

Once controlled, the steroid is reduced slowly to minimize side effects. Some patients then go into remission; however, many patients need a small maintenance dose to keep the disease under control.[2]

Last updated: 3/3/2010

References
  1. Pemphigus. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). June 2015; http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Pemphigus/default.asp. Accessed 9/1/2015.
  2. Pemphigus. International Pemphigus & Pemphigoid Foundation. 2010; http://www.pemphigus.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=364&Itemid=100073. Accessed 3/3/2010.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Pemphigus. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.