Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Polymyositis


See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

Are there any medical breakthroughs or medical trials that are being conducted for polymyositis?  Can the symptoms be reversed if the proper treatment is done?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How might polymyositis be treated?

The treatment of polymyositis is based on the signs and symptoms present in each person. Although there is currently no cure, symptoms of the condition may be managed with the following:[1][2][3]
  • Medications such as corticosteroids, corticosteroid-sparing agents, immunosuppressive drugs
  • Physical therapy to improve muscle strength and flexibility
  • Speech therapy to address difficulties with swallowing and speech
  • Intravenous immunoglobulin (healthy antibodies are given to block damaging autoantibodies that attack muscle)

Medscape Reference's Web site offers more specific information regarding the treatment and management of polymyositis. Please click on the link to access the resource.
Last updated: 9/10/2015

What clinical trials are being conducted for polymyositis?

A list of clinical trials available to individuals with polymyositis can be found at Clinicaltrials.gov.  This website includes a section on "Understanding Clinical Trials" that provides detailed information about participating in a clinical trial.
Last updated: 11/24/2010

What is the long-term outlook for people with polymyositis?

The long-term outlook (prognosis) for people with polymyositis varies. Most affected people respond well to treatment and regain muscle strength, although a certain degree of muscle weakness may persist in some cases.[4] If the treatment is not effective, people may develop significant disability.[5]

In rare cases, people with severe and progressive muscle weakness will develop respiratory failure or pneumonia. Difficulty swallowing may cause weight loss and malnutrition.[5]
Last updated: 9/10/2015

References
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.