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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Progressive supranuclear palsy


Other Names for this Disease
  • Supranuclear palsy, progressive
  • PSP
  • Steele-Richardson-Olszewski Syndrome
  • Familial progressive supranuclear palsy (type)
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Prognosis

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What is the long-term outlook for people with progressive supranuclear palsy?

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) gets progressively worse.[1] Most people become dependent for care within three or four years from onset, and quality of life is significantly reduced.[2] However, with good attention to medical and nutritional needs, it is possible for many people with PSP to live a decade or more after the first symptoms appear. The condition predisposes people to serious complications such as pneumonia (the most common cause of death) secondary to difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia). Other complications that people may experience include choking, head injury, and fractures caused by falls.[1]
Last updated: 1/29/2016

References
  1. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Fact Sheet. NINDS. November 5, 2015; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/psp/detail_psp.htm.
  2. Stewart A Factor, Christine Doss Esper. Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). UpToDate. Waltham, MA: UpToDate; December, 2015;


Other Names for this Disease
  • Supranuclear palsy, progressive
  • PSP
  • Steele-Richardson-Olszewski Syndrome
  • Familial progressive supranuclear palsy (type)
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.